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An Interview with Marc Erickson


Welcome to our exclusive interview with Marc Erickson, the talented singer/songwriter

from Nebraska and now making waves in the vibrant music scene of Los Angeles.

Erickson is a firm believer in the healing power of music, viewing it as more than just

melodies and lyrics, but as a potent remedy capable of transforming thoughts, energies,

and lives.


Drawing inspiration from a rich tapestry of folk-rock and psychedelic-pop influences,

Erickson crafts a sound that harkens back to the golden age of rock musicals while

infusing it with a contemporary twist. His debut release, "We Are The Medicine" serves as both a prayer and a rallying cry, urging listeners to recognize their own innate

capacity for healing and guidance.


With his sophomore release, "Imagine a Happy Ending" Erickson takes on the role of a

musical visionary. Inspired by the tumultuous events of 2020, he invites listeners to join

him in envisioning a brighter future, one where imagination paves the way for positive

change. Drawing on the legacy of protest songs from the 60s, Erickson sees music as a

catalyst for social transformation, a unifying force capable of mobilizing people towards

a common purpose.


Beyond his musical endeavors, Erickson is also a community builder, spearheading the

"We Are The Medicine" gatherings in Los Angeles. These inclusive events bring together

individuals from all walks of life, providing a platform for creative expression and

collective healing.


We sat down with Marc Erickson to find out more about his latest singles, his upcoming

releases, and his philosophies behind his music.


RAG: I saw you play at Hotel Café in Hollywood last month and was surprised to

hear how eclectic your songwriting is. Who are some of your top musical influences?


Marc Erickson: Growing up I listened to my mom's records, 8 tracks and tapes. I very

rarely listened to the music of the current time period unless I was at a school dance or

with friends. I loved the Everly Brothers, the Beach Boys, Beatles and Gordon Lightfoot,

to name a handful, but the list is really endless.


RAG: One thread throughout the songs that I’ve heard is that your music carries

a powerful message of empowerment and collective responsibility. Can you share more

about your philosophies?


Marc Erickson: Absolutely. I firmly believe that our thoughts create our reality, both

individually and collectively. We have the ability to manifest any change we wish to see

in our lives and in the world around us. It's about taking responsibility for our thoughts,

feelings, and actions.


RAG: That's profound. In today's world filled with distractions, how do you

suggest we stay aligned with our intentions and desires?


Marc Erickson: It's definitely a challenge with the constant bombardment of distractions

like vices, entertainment, and consumerism. I think it starts with identifying our desires

and being intentional about what we do, say, and consume. We need to consistently

steer ourselves toward what we want for ourselves and for the world.


RAG: Your perspective on interconnectedness and unity is inspiring. How do you

envision a world where we all recognize our oneness?


Marc Erickson: It may sound cliché, but we really are all part of one world, one family.

The question is, what will it take for us to collectively realize that? It's something I often

ponder and hope to contribute to through my music.


RAG: Your latest release, "Imagine a Happy Ending" carries a strong message of

hope and activism. Can you elaborate on the inspiration behind this song?


Marc Erickson: "Imagine a Happy Ending" draws inspiration from the revolutionary spirit

of the 60s protest songs. It reflects on the fundamental principles our country was

founded upon and urges us to fight against forces that threaten our rights. As a new

father, creating a safer world for future generations is more important to me than ever.


RAG: It's fascinating how your music channels the spirit of the 60s protest songs.

Was that intentional, or did it naturally emerge in your songwriting process?


Marc Erickson: It actually wasn't intentional; I think it was a result of being a kid growing

up in Nebraska, listening to my mom's records. Those 60s protest songs left a profound

impact on me. Now, living in Los Angeles, I find myself naturally excited to engage in

that artistic and political conversation that moved me as a kid.


RAG: What can your fans expect from you in the future? Any exciting projects in

the works?


Marc Erickson: Well, these last two singles have been tracks from my upcoming full-

length album, “Animals and Angels,” which I’ll be announcing later on this year after a

few more releases in the vein of the last two songs, more or less. Besides that, I feel like

I'm undergoing a bit of a musical evolution, transitioning from vintage rock-infused plant

medicine tunes to exploring more of a country sound. It's an exciting journey, and I'm

eager to see where it takes me.


RAG: Lastly, are you performing live anywhere soon?


Marc Erickson: Well, you mentioned that last show at Hotel Café, and thanks for coming

to that and introducing yourself, by the way! (Laughs). Recently, the band and I had the

incredible opportunity to play for retired Veterans at the CalVets in Brentwood. It was

an incredible experience. One thing that I love about music is that it brings us all

together, regardless of age or background. So, when I'm not playing in ceremony circles,

I do enjoy performing live, and I’ll be announcing some upcoming shows soon via

Instagram.


RAG: We’ll be sure to link that at the end of the interview so people can follow

along. Any last words that you want to leave the audience with?


Marc Erickson: Be mindful of what you are telling yourself. Pick empowering stories to

fuel your life. Be everything you want to be, do everything you want to do, love

everyone you want to love.

























































































































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